Monthly Archives: January 2014

Materials in East Asian languages

The main collection for East Asian Studies (including resources in Chinese and Japanese languages) is in the Brotherton Library (Main building floor 1).

Searching for material

  • Books on East Asian Studies in Western languages, Mongolian and Korean are included in the Library Catalogue
  • Works in Chinese and Japanese are searchable in script via the Library Catalogue
  • Records for older materials not yet added to the online catalogues are listed in the Manual Catalogue.

Chinese

The Library’s large collection of Chinese materials contains over 60,000 monographs and 400 serials. In addition, the Chinese Collection of the Library of the Royal Asiatic Society is held in Special Collections. This covers a wide range of subject areas, with particular strengths in modern and contemporary China.

The Chinese classification schedule (PDF) gives an overview of the areas covered. Areas of interest include:

  • contemporary politics and economics
  • society and population
  • literature, drama and film since 1919
  • 20th century history
  • overseas Chinese
  • Contemporary Taiwan
  • Hong Kong after 1997.

The guide to finding Chinese materials provides further information about Chinese catalogues and locations.

Japanese

The Library started to develop the Japanese Collection in the early 1980s. There is a small collection in Japanese language of about 3,000 monographs and 30 periodical titles. The Library acquires materials on such subjects as modern literature, language, linguistics, theatre, history, geography and economy. The Japanese classification schedule (PDF) gives further information.

Mongolian

The Brotherton Library has a small Mongolian collection. Commercial channels are as yet undeveloped, so most of these materials are acquired on exchange or by personal contact.

Thai

The Library started to build its Thai collection in 2005. The material mainly relates to language, politics and religious studies.

source: http://library.leeds.ac.uk/info/156/east_asian_studies/110/materials_in_east_asian_languages/1

Catalogue of the Mongolian Manuscripts and Xylographs in the St. Petersburg State University Library

Uspensky V. Catalogue of the Mongolian Manuscripts and Xylographs in the St. Petersburg State University Library / Compiled by V. L. Uspensky with assistance from O. Inoue. Edited and Foreword by T. Nakami.  Tokyo: Institute for the Study of Languages and Cultures of Asia and Africa, 1999. XV, 530 pp.

FOREWORD
It is worthy of note that the Russian researchers of the past have produced great works in the field of Mongolian studies. In fact, anyone wishing to commence studying the history, language, culture of the Mongols at some stage will have to refer to Russian scholarship. Russia has a long tradition of Mongolian studies. The first chair of Mongolian language at any university in the world was founded at Kazan in 1833. Later, from the middle of the nineteenth century, St. Petersburg turned into a world center for Mongolian studies. Russian Mongolists earnestly and ambitiously — in both good and bad meanings — investigated and collected many primary materials from the Mongolian homelands and Peking.
After the Russian Socialist Revolution of 1917 and in particular since the 1950s, the emphasis in Mongolian studies in the Soviet Union shifted from the classical to the strategic and ideological. The headquarters of Oriental studies in the USSR also moved from Leningrad to Moscow. However, the rich collection of Mongolian manuscripts and xylographs and the academic tradition of Mongolian philology were left in Leningrad.
Two important Mongolian collections in St. Petersburg, one in the “Institute” and the other in the “University”, have now attracted the attention of Mongolian researchers all over the world. To facilitate easy access to the collections, catalogues are essential. A detailed catalogue of part of the Mongolian collection in the St. Petersburg Branch of the Institute of Oriental Studies was compiled by Dr. L. S. Puchkovskiy in 1957. Thereafter, Dr. A. G. Sazykin has continued to compile a complete catalogue of the collection. However, no catalogue of the Mongolian collection in the St. Petersburg State University has appeared except for that of the famous Kanjur, compiled by Dr. Z. K. Kasyanenko and published in 1993.
In 1994, when I visited St. Petersburg and met with Dr. V. L. Uspensky, he spoke to me warmly about his plan to compile a catalogue of the University’s entire Mongolian collection. Between 1996 and 1997, he was invited to the Institute for the Study of Languages and Cultures of Asia and Africa in Tokyo as a visiting professor, where he undertook most of the compilation work. He completed the first draft after his return to Russia in 1998 and sent it to me for checking. Due to the great length of the work, I asked a younger distinguished Mongol philologist, Dr. Osamu Inoue of Waseda University, for his support. Dr. Inoue kindly and carefully read over all of the draft, and made many important suggestions.
It is our great pleasure through this catalogue to introduce the contents of one of the most important Mongolian collections in the world to our colleagues in Mongolian studies. Finally, I would like to thank Dr. Uspensky for his long and sustained efforts, and Dr. Inoue for his prudent advice. I also wish to thank Prof. Christian Daniels for his kind help in improving the English text and Mr. Wataru Izumi and his staff at the University of Tokyo Press for editorial suggestions.
Tatsuo Nakami

source: http://www.orientalstudies.ru/eng/index.php?option=com_publications&Itemid=75&pub=413

 

Inner Mongolian Museum

Situated  in the north-west of the intersection at Xinhua East Street and Dongerhuan Road,  Hohhot, the Inner Mongolia Museum is adjacent to Wulanqiate Grand Theater with  a main building area of more than 50,000 square meters, a 4-story main  structure and a 6-story local structure. It has a unique design and advanced  equipment composed of the exhibition hall, a cultural relic storeroom, the  audience service area, the business district of scientific research and a multi-functional  hall. The museum expresses the strong modern elements, the regional features and  the local minorities’ characteristics; it is known as an “Encyclopedia” which  reflects hundreds of millions of years’ history of ecological changes and the developments  of the civilization across the grasslands. It is also a landmark of the  development of economy, society and the civilizational level in this  autonomous region.

Exhibits

Based on the abundant resources, such as ancient biology fossils, current biology, historical relics and ethnic  cultural relics in the autonomous region, the  museum has a “grassland culture exhibition series” with the theme of “prairie  culture” represented in both of the basic  displays and the thematic displays. These displays are distributed in the  exhibition hall over three stories, which total 14 display areas.

The second story: there are  four basic displays named “Ancient biology fossils”, “The natural living  exhibition”, “Geological and mineral specimens” and “China  Aerospace Science and Technology Exhibition”, showing the  development of the grassland culture. The scenery presented is as vivid as  life.

The third story: the four  basic displays called “The national history of ancient Inner  Mongolia”, “Family history of ancient Inner Mongolia”, “The  modern ethnic customs of Inner Mongolia” and “The  modern revolutionary history of Inner Mongolia” can be  visited, which present the longitudinal development of the grassland culture  from three periods: ancient times, the modern age and contemporary times. They are easily  understood as they are concisely and lively exhibited.

The fourth story focuses on  six thematic displays: “Cultural relics in the New Stone Age”, “The ancient  horse relics”, “The ancient  costume cultural relics”, “The  ancient and modern dance art”, “Ancient  culture and art heritage” and “Cultural relics of the ancient  grassland’s Silk Road”, which highlight the  six wonderful points of the prairie culture.

These displays are arranged in a crisscross pattern with multi-faceted,  multi-angle exhibits, which systematically describe the image of Inner  Mongolia.

Collections

There are more than 100,000 sets of collections in the Inner Mongolia  Museum which can be classified as fossil specimens, historical relics, ethnic relics  and modern cultural relics.

The museum holds  44,000 objects relating to ethnic history in its collections. Among these, quite  a few are rare treasures seldom seen in China, especially the artifacts  relating to the northern tribes called Xiongnu 匈奴, Xianbei  鲜卑, and Qidan 契丹 Mongolians.  This makes them the special collections in the Inner Mongolia Museum.

The museum also  pays great attention to collections of national folk cultural relics. At  present, there are more than 3,000 sets of such objects, which completely reflect  the lifestyles and customs of ethnic groups of Mongolia: Ewenki, Oroqen and Daur.  Among these, costumes of Mongolian women from different parts of Inner Mongolia,  as well as Mongolian religious artifacts, are the most attractive.

Inner Mongolia is  also known as the’Land of Fossils’. Through years of archaeological  excavations, considerable fossil specimens across the ages have been collected in  the Inner Mongolia Museum, which has attracted global attention.

The Precious Collection

Nuoerosaurus changanensis

Nuoerosaurus is the largest Asian Cretaceous dinosaur with a body length of 16 meters, a height of 12  meters and a weight of more than 60 tons. It is named after the place, Qagan  Lake, where it was discovered.

The Crown of Xiongnu Tribe

Made of gold with a weight of 1,394 grams, it is a national  treasure and the only gold crown of Xiongnu Chanyu (the monarch of the Xiongnu  nationality) found so far. The crown is constituted of a golden eagle and cap  band, and is embossed with a pattern of a sheep and a wolf. The eagle stands on  the top of the hemispherical crown, watching the battle between the wolf and the  sheep.

The Yunyao Incense Burner

It is the rarely-seen porcelain of the Yuan Dynasty and has  a height of 42.7 centimeters and a caliber of 25.5 centimeters. With a straight  burner mouth,round drum abdomen, rectangular straight ear on  each side of the burner mouth, and three unicorns carved in the neck of the  incense burner, this incense burner has very special features and is the “national  treasure”.

The Precious Cultural Relics of the Liao Dynasty

The Qidan nationality brought the grassland culture to a new  peak. The great archaeological discoveries of the Liao Dynasty a large  number of precious cultural relics unearthed like gold and silver ware, glass  ware, agate ware and lacquer ware became prominent  in the Inner Mongolia Museum.

The National Unity Baoding

The National Unity Baoding is placed beside the channel of  the front gate. This round bronze Baoding shows stateliness with its two tall  ears, the solid tripod and the exquisitely patterned tripod body and tripod  neck which symbolized the landform characteristics of Inner Mongolia, and the scene  of cattle and sheep flocks. The saddle-shaped tripod ears and the  horse-hoof-shaped tripod feet reflect the good horses and fine shooting in Mongolia,  and express good luck and happiness.

Special Activities

Ethnic Etiquette and Custom Performance: a Hada Presentation,  the Mongolian Long Tune and the Horse Head Fiddle. These give audiences a  closer and more intuitive way to enjoy the charm and elegant demeanor of the prairie  culture.

Travel Essentials

Opening times: 9:00 am-5:30  pm in summer, 9:30 am-5:00 pm in winter.

Free of charge from Tuesdays to Sundays and closed all day  on Mondays (except for the public holidays).

Address: 27, Xinhua Dong Street,  Xincheng District, Hohhot City, Inner Mongolia.

Transportation: Take bus 1, 5, 13, 21, 22,  24, 34 or 303 from Hohhot City and transfer to the sightseeing bus in Xinhua Square.

source: http://www.chinahighlights.com/hohhot/attraction/inner-mongolian-museum.htm

Uranchimeg Ujeed: Horchin monggul üligertü daguu (Horchin Mongolian Narrative Songs)

The World Oral Literature Project is pleased to host Uranchimeg Ujeed’s collection. Details of the full collection can be browsed on DSpace@Cambridge by clicking here.

In this collection, there are 38 video recordings of Horchin Mongolian songs made during fieldwork in 2010 and 2011. The collection contains songs by bards, amateur singers as well as ordinary people. Although most of them are narrative songs, only a few of them are sung in the proper manner as they were in the past. Most of them are sung in fractions. There are also interviews about local knowledge of the narrative songs, the historical fact the songs based on, the song characters, the occasions the songs are sung, different people’s attitude towards the different styles of singing, their ideas about the present endangered state of the songs, their longing to and difficulty of maintaining the tradition etc.

Uranchimeg Ujeed recorded the films in 4th April – 4th May 2010, and 10th – 24th September 2011.

Collection Details:

Collection: Horchin monggul üligertü daguu (Horchin Mongolian Narrative Songs)         Collector: Uranchimeg Ujeed         Date(s): 2010-2011       Language(s): Mongolian, Horchin dialect

1. Bütügegchi- Agajud ail-un magtagal (Eulogy of Agajud village) Bütügegchi is an amateur bard who is trying to get official recognition as a folk artist. He also tells hugur-un üliger which is a special Horchin Folk Art. Holbuga is a genre of alliterative musical poetry. Most bards are good at compiling Holbuga. They often sing a Holbuga simultaneously in accordance with the specific situation. This Holbuga is a eulogy of his village which has simultaneous components added in relation to our visit. Holbuga also has different melodies. [Archive] [Watch video]

2. Bütügegchi, Senggerenchin   Bütügegchi is an amateur bard who is trying to get official recognition as a folk artist. He also tells hugur-un üliger which is a special Horchin Folk Art. Senggerenchin is a narrative song about Senggerenchin (1811–May 19, 1865) a ruling prince of the Banner, general in the late Qing dynasty. He is mainly known for his role during the Second Opium War and the suppression of the Taiping and Nian rebellions. He is now also eulogized as a local hero. [Archive] [Watch video]

3. Ochir, Baljinima Jana   Ochir is a professionally trained singer who is learning folk song performance from several bards including Bütügegchi after he graduated from Inner Mongolia Music college. [Archive] [Watch video]

4. Ochir, Nutug Usu (Homeland)   Ochir is a professionally trained singer who is learning folk song performance from several bards including Bütügegchi after he graduated from Inner Mongolia Music college. Eulogy of one’s homeland is a common theme of the Holbuga (Alliterative musical poetry) genre in Horchin. Most bards can compile one. [Archive] [Watch video]

5. Bütügegchi, Eji-in achi (Mother’s favour)   Bütügegchi is an amateur bard who is trying to get official recognition as a folk artist. He also tells hugur-un üliger which is a special Horchin Folk Art. In Horchin songs, like in any other parts of Mongolia, recounting mother’s favour is a very popular theme. [Archive] [Watch video]

6. Zhengyue, Liangjin goloo   Zhengyue is an ordinary housewife who liked singing since she was young. Most of her songs were learnt from her father who was born in 1911. This song is love song titled after the female character. [Archive] [Watch video]

7. Yuge, Suiying   Yuge is an ordinary housewife. She said she used to sing a lot when she was young but has forgotten most of them now. Suiying is an orphan girl’s song before she was married leaving behind two young siblings.  [Archive] [Watch video]

8. Zhengyue, Jinjür   Zhengyue is an ordinary housewife who liked singing since she was young. Most of her songs were learnt from his father who was born in 1911. This song is a love song titled after the female character. [Archive] [Watch video]

9. Yuge, Hoyar lieshu (Two Martyrs)   Yuge is an ordinary housewife. She said she used to sing a lot when she was young but has forgotten most of them now. This is a song about two martyrs of the village who were killed by the Kuomindang army. Yuge said nobody else knows this song any longer. [Archive] [Watch video]

10. Zhengyue, Dagula   Zhengyue is an ordinary housewife who liked singing since she was young. Most of her songs were learnt from his father who was born in 1911. This song is a love song titled after the female character. [Archive] [Watch video]

11. Mönghöljei, Tuguljin Agula Mönghöljei is an ordinary countryman who likes singing. Most of his songs were learnt from his maternal grandmother and uncle. This song is a eulogy of a mountain in the neighbouring Darhan Banner. [Archive] [Watch video]

12. Mönghöljei, Tengriin Salhin   Mönghöljei is an ordinary countryman who likes singing. Most of her songs were learnt from his maternal grandmother and uncle. This song is a eulogy of a mountain in the neighbouring Darhan Banner. [Archive] [Watch video]

13. Mönghöljei, Dörben chag-un daguu (Song of the Four Seasons)   Mönghöljei is an ordinary countryman who likes singing. Most of her songs were learnt from his maternal grandmother and uncle. This song is a eulogy of a mountain in the neighbouring Darhan Banner. This song is a very traditional long tuned song which reflects the seasonal movements of nomadic lifestyle. [Archive] [Watch video]

14. Mönghöljei, Namug Chegel-ün Burgasu (Willow at Marshy Spring)   Mönghöljei is an ordinary countryman who likes singing. Most of his songs were learnt from his maternal grandmother and uncle. This song is a eulogy of a mountain in the neighbouring Darhan Banner. This song is about sending off the marrying daughter. [Archive] [Watch video]

15. Mönghöljei, Jinjiema   Mönghöljei is an ordinary countryman who likes singing. Most of his songs were learnt from his maternal grandmother and uncle. This song is about a man missing his deceased wife. [Archive] [Watch video]

16. Mönghöljei, Baihü gege (Brother Baihü)   Mönghöljei is an ordinary countryman who likes singing. Most of his songs were learnt from his maternal grandmother and uncle. This song is about a girl’s lament over her not being able to marry her loved one due to arranged marriage. [Archive] [Watch video]

17. Ündüsü, Nugunjiyaga   Ündüsü is an ordinary countryman. This song is about a far away married girl’s missing of her mother’s home. [Archive] [Watch video]

18. Zhengyue, Gerele Angga (Darling Gerele)   Zhengyue is an ordinary housewife who likes singing since she was young. Most of her songs were learnt from his father who was born in 1911. This song is about a grandparents’ sentiment about marrying away of their loved granddaughter. [Archive] [Watch video]

19. Lungyan, Baibai Angga   Lungyan is an ordinary housewife who seldom sings. She sings this song as she heard from her father. This song is about a man missing his lover. [Archive] [Watch video]

20. Mönghöljei, Hanxiuying   Mönghöljei is an ordinary countryman who likes singing. Most of his songs were learnt from his maternal grandmother and uncle. This narrative song is said to consist of 44 verses. It is about a panicked mother finding a baldicoot shaman husband for her 18- year-old daughter who attracted many men in nearby villages. This song is very humorous, mocking the panicked mother and delighted son-in-law who has an unexpected good fortune of finding such a beautiful wife. [Archive] [Watch video]

21. Yosutu, Gada Meiren Gada Meiren is a narrative song about a local hero who fought against Chinese warlord’s cultivation of pastureland. These two verses are most popularly sung all over Inner Mongolia instead of singing whole narrative song nowadays. [Archive] [Watch video]

22. Yosutu, Shishü Meiren   Shishü Meiren is a song about a local military official’s departing for a battle and his wife’s seeing him off by presenting a cup of alcohol and making good wishes. [Archive] [Watch video]

23. Yosutu, Sangjie Mama   Sangjie Mama is song about a monk’s lament for not being able to be together with his loved girl. There are several such songs in Horchin. [Archive] [Watch video]

24. Yolu, Xia Zhou Ulus (Xia Zhou Dynasty)   This is a performance of Yolu-yin Modu Band consists of locals. Xia Zhou Dynasty is an example of hugu-un üliger, Horchin story telling which was very popular in Modern time. This special genre of Horchin folk art is derived from Horchin epic singing in technique, and adapted Chinese classics in content. Hugur-un üliger also has had strong impact on the formation of Horchin narrative song. [Archive] [Watch video]

25. Yolu, Baljinima Jana   This is a performance of Yolu-yin Modu Band consists of locals. Another short version of the narrative song Baljinima Jana. [Archive] [Watch video]

26. Yolu Band, Gada Meiren; Holbuga-Horchin nutug-un magtagal; beye huyaglahu; Darhan hushigun-u magtagal (Yolu Band, Gada Meiren; Eulogy of Horchin land; Heroes putting on armour; Eulogy of Darhan Banner)   This is a performance of Yolu-yin Modu Band consists of locals. In this clip there is song about their local hero Gada Meiren, Eulogy of their mother land Horchin and their Darhan banner , and description of hero’s armouring himself, which is from Horchin story telling. [Archive] [Watch video]

27. Temür- Jinxiang’s grandson   Temür is grandson of Jinxiang who is the female character of a locally very famous narrative love song called by the name of the male character Danabal. Temür talks about the real people and the events, and how people have been and are singing and talking about their story from the fact differently. [Archive] [Watch video]

28. Hasunbagan talks about Song Danabal   Hasunbagan, the oldest man in the area who is known to know a lot about local culture. He used to sing well but due to a stroke, he stopped singing. The lady just beside him is his sister who often complemented what Hasunbagan tells. In this video, they talk about a narrative love song called Danabal from another perspective. [Archive] [Watch video]

29. Hasunbagan talks about Song Baljinima Jaana   Hasunbagan, the oldest man in the area who is known to know a lot about local culture. He used to sing well but due to a stroke, he stopped singing. The lady just beside him is his sister who often complemented what Hasunbagan tells. In this video, they talk about a narrative song about two local heroes called Baljinima and Jaana. [Archive] [Watch video]

30. Hasunbaga eulogy of Tobacco Pouch   Hasunbagan, the oldest man in the area who is known to know a lot about local culture. He used to sing well but due to a stroke, he stopped singing. He recites a Eulogy of Tabcco Pouch he used to make on weddings. He says he compiled it. [Archive] [Watch video]

31. Bayasgulang, Yandan Güngjü (Princess Yandan) Bayasgualng, an amateur bard who has a passion for singing by playing the instrument called dörben utasutu hugur (four stringed fiddle). Although the song Yandan Güngjü was a figure from Chinese classical story, the song is in Mongolian character describing the beauty, intelligence and deft. This shows a Horchin Mongolian way of describing a woman. [Archive] [Watch video]

32. Bayasgulang, Yandan Gangraima   Bayasgualng, an amateur bard who has a passion for singing by playing the instrument called dörben utasutu hugur (four stringed fiddle). Although the song Yandan Güngjü was a figure from Chinese classical story, the song is in Mongolian character describing the beauty, intelligence and deft. This shows a Horchin Mongolian way of describing a woman. [Archive] [Watch video]

33. Bayasgulang, Danabal   Bayasgualng, an amateur bard who has a passion for singing by playing the instrument called dörben utasutu hugur (four stringed fiddle). He is singing the Narrative song Danabal in the traditional way by playing the instrument. [Archive] [Watch video]

34. Bayasgulang, Nutug-un magtagal (Eulogy of Homeland)   Bayasgualng, an amateur bard who has a passion for singing by playing the instrument called dörben utasutu hugur (four stringed fiddle). This is another unique genre of Horchin folk art called holbuga, a kind of alliterative musical poetry. Bayasgulang says he compiled this holbuga.  [Archive] [Watch video]

35. Bayasgulang, Uyugunsandan   Bayasgualng, an amateur bard who has a passion for singing by playing the instrument called dörben utasutu hugur (four stringed fiddle). Uyugunsandan is a Horchin love song named after the female character of the song. [Archive] [Watch video]

36. Bayasgulang, Nam-un achi (Favour of the Party)   Bayasgualng, an amateur bard who has a passion for singing by playing the instrument called dörben utasutu hugur (four stringed fiddle). This is another unique genre of Horchin folk art called holbuga, a kind of alliterative musical poetry. Bayasgulang says he compiled this holbuga.  [Archive] [Watch video]

37. Amateur Singers singing   Amateur Singers who have participated in folk song contests. They talked about present situation of singing narrative songs, song contests etc.; they sing the songs they sang in the contests. In this clip they sing the songs titled Gaoxiaojie, Jinjurma, Ölgei Hairtai Shonhur.  [Archive] [Watch video]

38. Amateur Singers, Danabal, Baljinima Jana   Amateur Singers who have participated in folk song contests. Danabal is sung in antiphonal style in a very modern way. Baljinima Jana is sung with narration. These can be compared to Bayasgulang’s singing in traditional way in 33.  [Archive] [Watch video]

source: http://www.oralliterature.org/collections/uujeed001.html

Mongolian Altai Inventory Image Collection

Mongolian Altai Inventory Image Collection

The image collection presents approximately 1,500 images supporting the Archaeology and Landscape in the Altai Mountains of Mongolia website.

The information presented on the Archaeology and Landscape in the Altai Mountains of Mongolia website is the result of eighteen  field seasons in the Altai Mountains of Russia and Mongolia. The  extensive materials we have been able to gather and document represent  the first broad inventory of surface archaeology in northwestern  Mongolia.

source: http://oregondigital.org/digcol/maic/

 

The Mongolian Collections – Retracing Hans Leder

LANG, Maria-Katharina; BAUER, Stefan (Hg.) Titel: The Mongolian Collections – Retracing Hans Leder. (ISBN: 978-3-7001-7520-9)

This volume presents the results of a project realised within the research programme Research at Museums (forMuse). Selected objects from the collections of the Austrian research traveller and collector Hans Leder (1843–1921), which are located at the Weltmuseum Vienna and other ethnographic museums in Central Europe, are reunited here for the first time. These are primarily Buddhist ritual items of daily life in northern Mongolia around 1900. Following an introduction to the history of the collection, with numerous original quotations by the collector, and historic and recent insights to Mongolian Buddhism, specific object groups are presented and described. An illustrated section within this appealingly designed book shows as yet unpublished object photographs that were taken during the project. The volume brings together descriptions of artefacts from multiple points of view. The interdisciplinary project team thus provides a new approach to a collection of Mongolian art which is unique in its abundance and authenticity. With contributions by Ágnes Birtalan, Olaf Czaja, Béla Kelényi, Maria-Katharina Lang, Lhagvademchig S. Jadamba and Krisztina Teleki.

source: http://www.oeaw.ac.at/sozant/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=340%3Athe-mongolian-collections-retracing-hans-leder&catid=25%3Aneuerscheinungen-und-vorankuendigungen&Itemid=36&lang=de

First Encyclopedia of Mongolian Studies Published

(retrospective)

Two volumes of a comprehensive Mongolian encyclopedia, the world’s first, have recently been published by the Inner Mongolian People’s Publishing House.

The two volumes are on Mongolian literature and medicine. The publishing of 18 more volumes will be completed by 2006, covering a large number of subjects including ancient Mongolian history, geography, cultural relics and archeology.

The encyclopedia will be published in both Mongolian and Chinese languages.

North China’s Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region has appropriated5 million yuan (about US$602,410) for the publication of the encyclopedia, listed as one of China’s key publishing and scientific research projects.

At present, study of the history and culture and scientific and technological development of Mongolians, an ethnic group that has greatly influenced the world, is carried out in more than 50 countries and regions in the world.

Mongolian studies have received funding from the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO).

(Xinhua News Agency October 23, 2002)

Tuvan Center for Mongolian Studies Was Opened in Kyzyl

(retrospective)

Marianna Kharunova

On November 26, 2010 Tuvan Center for Mongolian Studies at the Tuvan Institute for Research in the Humanities under the Government of the Republic of Tyva was opened. Among the guests of honor at the event there was the Consul General of Mongolia in Kyzyl in the Russian Federation Mr. Dashbalbar Bazarsad. Director of the TIRH Bicheldey Kaadyr-ool introduced aims and goals of the center and its short-range plans. Research and scientific events will be conducted within the framework of the formerly signed agreements with the Mongolian Academy of Sciences and other scientific institutions of Mongolia. The Tuvan Institute for Research in the Humanities, Tuvan State University, and Aldyn Maadyr National Museum of the Republic of Tyva create the scientific basis of the center. It was also announced at the presentation that they are planning to hold the III International Conference “Tengriism and Epic Heritage of the Nations of Eurasia” in Kyzyl from July 1 till 3 July, 2011.

source: http://en.tuva.asia/49-tuvan-center-for-mongolian-studies.html